Resolutions

Courtesy Resolutions

R-1: Discontinuing single-use plastic, single-use foam and single-use bottled water at diocesan churches and facilities

Resolved, that this 225thAnnual Convention calls upon all churches, schools, conference centers and offices of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia to discontinue the use of disposable, single-use plastic and foam products including but not limited to: plates, cutlery, cups, straws, food wraps and bags; and be it further

Resolved, that this 225thAnnual Convention calls upon all churches, schools, conference centers and offices of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia to discontinue the use of single-use plastic bottled water; and be it further

Resolved, that this 225thAnnual Convention calls upon all churches, schools, conference centers and offices of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia to transition to reusable, compostable and/or washable alternatives to single-use plastic, foam products and water containers.

Background:

Since the 1950s, 8.3 billion tons of plastic has been produced worldwide.1Plastic is a non-biodegradable product. Most of the plastic ever produced in the history of the world still exists in some form. 91% of it is never recycled and ends up in landfills or the open environment. Roughly half of the world’s plastic production is dedicated to single-use products such a packaging, food containers and water bottles.

The following is a brief list of statistics about plastic and styrofoam waste:

500 billion disposable cups are consumed every year. Americans alone throw away 25 billion styrofoam coffee cups every year. Styrofoam cannot be completely recycled. Most of the Styrofoam disposed of today will still be present in landfills 500 years from now.2 

32% of the 78 million tons of plastic packaging produced annually is not recycled or sent to landfills. It is left unmanaged and flows into the world’s oceans through streams and rivers.3

90% of the trash in the world’s oceans is plastic, roughly 46,000 pieces per square mile.4  

Improper waste management is a global crisis. If plastic pollution continues at its current rate, it is predicted that plastic will outweigh all fish in the oceans by 2050.5 The Episcopal Church identified Care of Creation as an integral part of the Jesus Movement in Resolution A013 at the 79thGeneral Convention in 2018. In passing this resolution, the Diocese of Virginia has an opportunity to play a leadership role in the Episcopal Church’s mission of environmental stewardship and provide an example practicable waste reduction.

Submitted by Mr. Jack Schick, on behalf of the Creation Care Task Force

References

1.www.globalcitizen.org
2-3www.earthday.org
4www.theworldcounts.com
5www.biologicaldiversity.org 

R-2: Adoption of Amended Diocesan Alcohol Use Policy

Resolved, by the 225th Convention of the Diocese of Virginia, that Convention adopt a new Diocesan Alcohol Use Policy, replacing the policy that was passed by General Convention in 1985. This amended policy reflects a deeper understanding of the impact of alcohol use in our parishes and in our lives, and seeks to set out standards for use of alcohol in church/parish/diocesan settings that respect Virginia law, the support of those who are in recovery, the protection of the vulnerable, and the requirement that the Godly work we are called upon to do is carried out in a conscientious and unimpaired manner. This policy also offers a variety of resources to educate all members of the Diocese about the need for these standards.

Submitted by the Executive Board and the Standing Committee of the Diocese of Virginia.

The Policy:

The Diocese of Virginia seeks to live out the Baptismal Covenant in its life and its policies. This means that we seek to follow Jesus Christ in our manner of life, and respect the dignity of every person. This policy therefore is a call to the whole Church to use alcohol in appropriate and thoughtful ways, so that people are not put in a position that compromises their membership in the Body of Christ or their own integrity, or that threatens the life of another with their actions.

The Diocese of Virginia’s alcohol policy conforms to Virginia state law which says:

  • Minors may not consume alcohol. 

  • If alcohol will be sold, the parish must first obtain a license from the Commonwealth 
of Virginia to do so. 

  • Every effort must be made to ensure that someone who has had too much to drink 
does not drive.

In addition to state law, the Diocese of Virginia affirms that: 


  • Alcohol should be consumed in moderation; 

  • There must be an equally attractive and equally accessible non-alcoholic option and 
the alcoholic option should be clearly labeled as such, especially if the parish is
 serving drinks such as alcoholic punch; 

  • No church business or open discussion of issues is to be conducted during or after 
the serving of alcohol. Business includes the work of vestry, search committee, all 
church committees and councils, and church schools. 

  • Parishes in the Diocese of Virginia should adhere to these policies. In addition, 
parishes are welcome to adopt their own more detailed policies concerning alcohol use on its properties and at parish events. 

  • The leadership of each parish, directed by the cleric-in-charge and vestry, should educate and inform its parishioners about alcoholism and substance abuse. 

  • There will be no consumption of alcohol by adults leading events which involve youth, e.g. Youth Group, Boy Scout outings, camps, etc. 


ALCOHOL POLICY AND GUIDELINES FOR CLERGY

BACKGROUND: Since 1981, the Diocese of Virginia has required that all future clergy be trained in alcohol abuse prevention prior to ordination. In 1985, a further Resolution of General Convention once again addressed the troubling issue of alcohol in the lives of our parishes: 


Resolution Number: 1985-A083

Title: Adopt Church Policy on Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Legislative Action Taken: Concurred as Amended 
Final Text: 


Resolved, That this 68th General Convention adopt the following policy statement:

AN EPISCOPAL NATIONAL POLICY ON ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE


The Episcopal Church acknowledges the need for exercising a healing ministry and for offering guidance to problem drinkers or chemically dependent persons and to members of their families. 


Alcoholism and other drug abuse are recognized as treatable human disorders which are manifested by a three-fold impairment of the body, mind and spirit. The Church concurs with health authorities that alcohol and other substance abuse is a major health concern of our society. It affects not only the alcoholic or abuser's health and self-concept, but also interpersonal relationships with family, co-workers, friends and counselors. It may affect any individual, regardless of financial situation, education, employment, race or creed. 


The Church calls on all clergy and lay people to take to heart the seriousness of the illness of alcohol and drug abuse and its manifestations as a disrupter of family, economic and social life; and urges all church people to do everything in their power to offer forth the love of Christ in his healing ministry to those afflicted persons and families. 


Diocesan Committees on Alcoholism and Drug Dependency 


The General Convention of 1979 encouraged each diocese to appoint a Diocesan Committee on Alcoholism and Drug Dependency to implement a program on alcohol and drug abuse. Such committees are responsible for developing a diocesan policy and planning a diocesan resource center for education, information, counseling and training. Clergy and lay counselors are encouraged to pursue continuing education in these fields. Congregations are encouraged to provide members with educational opportunities to learn more about the nature, prevention, techniques of treatment and pastoral care of alcoholics and drug abusers and their families. Trained consultants should be made available to interested clergy 
and congregations to facilitate this education process. Through education and usage of appropriate resources, intervention is made possible to stop the progress of the disorder before it runs its full destructive course.

The Church commends and encourages the many programs offering treatment and support to persons suffering from the illnesses of alcoholism and drug addiction. Clergy and vestries are encouraged to further their assistance to the National Episcopal Coalition on Alcohol (NECA), Alcoholics Anonymous, Al-Anon, AlaTeen Groups, Adult Children of Alcoholics Groups, Narcotics Anonymous and to chemical dependency programs and halfway houses as well as becoming knowledgeable concerning all local resources offering intervention, treatment and continuing care for these persons.

Employees of the Church

Alcoholic or drug dependent employees of the Church should be treated with pastoral love and concern. Church health insurance policies should include provision for the treatment and care of persons afflicted with these illnesses. Treatment intervention for the person and family along with counseling and continuing support during recovery should be coordinated by the clergy and other support groups in the parish. Every effort should be made to offer job protection and re-employment, with salaried sick leave during hospitalization, to alcoholics and drug abusers accepting treatment. Those refusing treatment will not be offered this protection.

Alcoholic Beverages in the Local Parish

The Episcopal Church has never endorsed prohibiting the use of beverages containing alcohol among adult members. Scripture offers Jesus' example of the use and serving of wine in his first miracle at Cana and in the institution of the Holy Eucharist. If an adult member elects to use alcohol, however, moderate usage is expected. Church members should be educated regarding those conditions that might consequently compromise the health and safety of oneself or others. The Church also supports and has a responsibility to those people who abstain from the use of alcoholic beverages for whatever reason. Many churches do not serve alcoholic beverages at social functions, but, for those which do, the following guidelines are given:

  • All applicable federal, state and local laws should be obeyed, including those governing the serving of alcoholic beverages to minors.
  • Alcoholic beverages and food containing alcohol must be clearly labeled as such.
  • Whenever alcohol is served, non-alcoholic alternatives must always be offered with equal attractiveness and accessibility.
  • The service of alcoholic beverages at church events should not be publicized as an attraction of the event.
  • The group or organization sponsoring the activity or event at which alcoholic beverages are served must have permission from the parish for this plan. Such groups or organizations must also assume responsibility for those persons who might become intoxicated and must provide alternative transportation for anyone whose capacity to drive may thus be impaired.
  • Recognizing the effect of alcohol as a mood-altering drug, it would be advisable to consider the nature of the function at which alcoholic beverages are proposed to be served.
  • Chemical usage other than alcohol is clearly controlled under federal, state and local laws and, as such, should be forbidden at any function.

From Resolution R-3 passed by the 186th Annual Council of the Diocese of Virginia, January 1981:

“Postulants and candidates for Holy Orders in the Diocese of Virginia, prior to ordination, shall receive and demonstrate an adequate understanding of prevention, recognition, intervention and treatment of alcoholism as a spiritual, physical, emotional and social illness.”

Every clergy person has promised in his or her ordination vows to do his or her best to “pattern your life in accordance with the teachings of Christ, so that you may be a wholesome example to all people.” Setting an example around appropriate use of alcohol and encouraging God’s people in healthy lifestyles is an important part of this commitment. Clergy are expected to refrain from over-indulgence at all times, but particularly when participating in functions where those under their spiritual charge are present, so that we are careful that our freedom does not become a stumbling block to others (1 Cor 8).

Should a clergyperson begin to suspect that he or she may have an alcohol problem, the cleric is expected to seek the guidance and pastoral care of a bishop. The bishop will assist the cleric in identifying resources, including a treatment facility, if necessary. The bishop will operate from the assumption that alcoholism is a disease to be treated, not a moral failing. However, if the cleric does not make every effort to seek treatment for alcohol abuse, and exhibits of a pattern of behavior that is contrary to the bishop’s guidance and the cleric’s ordination vows, the bishop will necessarily be put in a position of disciplining the cleric.

RESOURCES AND EDUCATION

Discussion Questions

  • †The New Testament has a number of references to the use of alcohol. Jesus turned water into wine at a wedding, and told parables in which people were encouraged to party; St Paul encouraged Timothy to drink a little wine with meals because it was good for the digestion, but also discouraged drunkenness. What is your understanding of the Bible’s view of alcohol? 

  • †Is there a “Christian” standard for alcohol use? 

  • †How do we honor those who are in recovery if and when we serve alcohol at church functions? 

  • †How should the church respond to recovering alcoholics? What about those who are not in recovery and who struggle with alcohol? 

  • †What is your view on serving alcohol at church functions? 

  • †Have you ever known someone who was struggling with addiction? What did you do? 
Was the church helpful? 

  • †Do you believe that leaders in the church (clergy and lay people) should be held to a higher standard of behavior around alcohol use? 

  • †Episcopalians have long valued the freedom we have to make thoughtful decisions for ourselves, tested out in the community of the church, about matters of faith, belief and how we act on our faith. How can we balance that freedom with the need to set boundaries around things like alcohol consumption?


TREATMENT OPPORTUNITIES: 


EDUCATIONAL SITES: 


  • This is the website for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism of the National Institutes of Health. Check out Alcohol and Your Health for extensive information on alcoholism and health issues. Also click on Publications and Multimedia for detailed information for both clinicians and lay persons on the clinical treatment and other aspects of alcoholism. The NIH also has a helpful section of screening tests for alcohol abuse. 

  • Suggested Resource: Alcoholism and Substance Abuse: Handbook for Clergy and Congregations by Stephen Apthorp, 2003 edition. This is a helpful guide for dealing with alcohol and drug abuse in congregational settings. This book can be seen online and acquired at the following link.
  • Counseling Resource Mental Health Library provides this screening quiz. 

  • The Recovery Ministries of the Episcopal Church has a page devoted to 12-Step Groups and additional resources and information.

R-3: Protesting water project on sacred Monacan Indian Nation Site

Resolved: That the 225th Annual Convention of the Diocese of Virginia meeting November 14- 16, 2019 in the city of Arlington, Virginia, standing with our sisters and brothers of the Monacan Nation, protests the construction of a proposed water intake and pumping station by the James River Water Authority that would pass through Rassawek, a former capital of the Monacan Indian Nation containing the buried remains of their ancestors.

Be it further resolved: that a copy of this resolution be sent to the Monacan Nation, the Governor of Virginia, the Board of Supervisors of Louisa and Fluvanna Counties, the James River Water Authority and the Army Corp of Engineers.

Background

Rassawek in the 1600’s was the capital of the Monacan Indian Nation located on the banks of the James River. Captain John Smith mentioned this city along with 4 other Monacan cities in his writings in 1612. This proposed project site, within the Diocese of Virginia, infringes on a historic Native American tribal site where ancestors of the Monacan Nation are buried. Today, all that is left of those ancestors is dust and bones. To disturb this land will disturb the remains of the ancestors. There are other sites along the James River that have been identified as appropriate sites for this water project.

We in our baptismal covenant promise to respect the dignity of every human being. Disturbing the remains of Native American Indian ancestors is not respectful of the dead or their living descendants. This proposed site infringes on a historic Native American tribal site. Those buried there deserve to rest in peace.

The Monacan Nation is the largest of our Virginia tribes and the least known. Their tribal grounds are located in the Diocese of Southwestern Virginia in Amherst County. They worship at St, Paul’s Episcopal Church, Bear Mountain adjacent to those tribal grounds. As our sisters and brothers in Christ, we stand with them in protesting the location of this water project on the site of their historic tribal city and its burial grounds.

The Committee on Aging is part of the Tri-Diocesan Council on Aging that puts on the annual Fall Camp held at Shrine Mont the end of October every year. Members of the Monacan Nation have been participants in this event over the years. We are grateful that the late Chief of the Monacan Nation, Sharon Bryant, attended annually Fall Camp before her death and presented several workshops enlightening us about her tribe. The outreach project last year went to help support the culture classes for the youth of the Monacan Nation for making their dance regalia, and learning more about their crafts, stories, language and traditions.

Submitted by The Rev. Marian K Windel on behalf of the Diocesan Committee on Aging

R-4: Clergy Pay Equity Resolution Proposed for the 225th Annual Convention of the Diocese of Virginia

Resolved, that the Diocese of Virginia continue to report at Annual Convention each year its status of achieving clergy pay equity by gender and race. And, be it further

Resolved, that the Diocese of Virginia and each of its congregations make public its compensation and benefits by amount and type, for each of its clergy employed, along with whether full-time or part-time work is being compensated, with each congregation to report this information each year to the Secretary of the Diocese along with parochial and other required annual reports and the Diocese to include this information in its Annual Convention Journal or Clergy Compensation Guidelines.

Background:


The Diocesan Pay Equity Task Force has documented and quantified a significant pay inequity between male and female clergy members in Diocese of Virginia positions, has offered insight into reasons the disparity exists, and has challenged the Diocese to identify, implement, and monitor remedies. This resolution follows the recommendations of the task force and proposes two easy-to-implement steps our Diocese could take now that could help our Diocese and each of its congregations move toward the goal of equal pay for equal work.

Submitted by: The Rev. Ann Barker,
 Rector, St. John’s, Arlington;
 The Rev. Jo J. Belser,
 Rector, Church of the Resurrection, Alexandria; The Rev. Charles Cowherd,
 Associate Rector, Church of the Good Shepherd, Burke;
 The Very Rev. Fran Gardner-Smith
, Rector, St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church, McLean;
 The Rev. Anne M. Turner,
 Program Coordinator, Deep Calls to Deep Program, Virginia Theological Seminary; The Rev. John Bolin Shellito,
 Associate Rector, St. George’s, Arlington;
 The Rev. Hillary T. West,
 Rector, Epiphany Church, Herndon

Courtesy Resolutions

CR-1: Commemorating the Service of the Rev. Deacon Donald H. Cady

Whereas, The Reverend Deacon Donald H. Cady, a vocational deacon of this diocese, served as the Deacon of Grace Church, Cismont, Virginia, for the past four years, from November 2014 until November 2018.

Whereas, Don Cady served as the Deacon at Emmanuel Church, Greenwood, Virginia from 2012 until 2014.

Whereas, Don Cady was ordained a vocational deacon in the Diocese of Virginia at St. Paul’s Church, Ivy, Virginia, in February 2012.

Whereas, Don Cady was a passionate volunteer for a wide variety of causes his entire adult life. He was a leader, fund-raiser and active supporter of causes ranging from youth baseball, children’s performing arts education, resource conservation and others.

Whereas, Don Cady lived his ordination and baptismal vows through his service as a volunteer for various veteran’s organizations, to include Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center, Richmond as adjunct chaplain; Grove House, Charlottesville, as mentor for veterans with PTSD; and as adjunct chaplain at the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville.

Whereas, Don Cady lifted up the Episcopal faith tradition by serving in various parish lay ministry roles to include serving on the vestries of the Parish of Saint Matthew, Pacific Palisades, California, and Trinity Church, Upperville, Virginia, as well as serving on the Cathedral Chapter of the Washington National Cathedral. Additionally he served as a lay representative to the Executive Board of the Diocese of Virginia under Bishop Peter James Lee.

Whereas, Don Cady believed strongly in the power of education and served as a board member of the Alban Institute as well as the St. Matthew’s Parish School, Pacific Palisades, California; Centenary College, Hackettstown, New Jersey; and Stuart Hall School, Staunton, Virginia.

Whereas, Don Cady reflected Jesus’ command to “do unto others…” by his recent service on the Board of Hospice of the Piedmont and as President of Meals On Wheels, Charlottesville.

Whereas, Don Cady was instrumental in establishing the annual Grace Church Farm Tour to raise funds for parish outreach ministries as well as the Grace Church Opus 77 Capital Campaign raising funds for the new organ and church renovations.

Whereas, Don Cady counted as his most enduring ministry and service to God in the dozens of mentorship opportunities he availed himself of for personal, professional and spiritual friends and colleagues of all ages, professions and personal backgrounds.

Resolved, that this 225th Annual Convention of the Diocese of Virginia remembers prayerfully the service of the Reverend Deacon Donald H. Cady for his faithful leadership and service and commends its prayers for his service to all.

Submitted by the Rev. G. Miles Smith and the Vestry of Grace Church, Cismont.

CR-2: Honoring the Christian Service of the Late Mr. Stephen C Wachenfeld, Parishioner of Grace Church, Walker Parish, in Cismont

Whereas, Stephen C. Wachenfeld was an active and devoted member of Grace Episcopal Church in Cismont, Virginia, for 20 years.

Whereas, to show his commitment to Grace Church, he served as Treasurer, three times as a Vestry member, Senior Warden, Lay Reader, Chalicist, Intercessor and served on many committees including head of the Interim Search Committee and the Food Closet.

Whereas, he donated his time, insight and intelligence to the Diocese of Virginia as a member and president of the Executive Board, a member of the Standing Committee and as an integral part of the Regional reorganization process.

Whereas, he devoted over 7 years as president of the Charlottesville Region in the Diocese of Virginia which thrived under his leadership.

Whereas, Stephen fulfilled his baptismal covenant to proclaim through word and example the Good News of God in the Charlottesville Region where he represented Grace Church and the Diocese with honor, insight and integrity.

Resolved, that this 225th Annual Convention of the Diocese of Virginia joins with the clergy, laity and staff of Grace Church, Cismont, and the Charlottesville Region in honoring the Christian service of Stephen C. Wachenfeld.

Submitted by the Rev. G. Miles Smith and the Vestry of Grace Church, Cismont.

CR-3: 250th Anniversary of the Episcopal Church of Leeds Parish, Markham

Whereas, Leeds Parish, covering much of Northern and Central Fauquier County, was established in 1769 by action of the Virginia House of Burgesses and has been in continuous existence since then. The name of the new parish was taken from Leeds Castle in England, the birthplace of Lord Fairfax, whose colonial estates encompassed most of the new Church of England (Anglican) parish. Formal ratification of the parish occurred in December of 1769, and worship services began immediately. The Episcopal Church of Leeds Parish has affirmed our baptismal covenant by proclaiming through word and example the Good News of God in Jesus Christ both in Markham and Hume as well as surrounding communities; and

Whereas, for 250 years The Episcopal Church of Leeds Parish has sought to seek and serve Christ in all persons, loving neighbors as itself; and has striven for justice and peace among all people, and to respect the dignity of every human being; and

Whereas, “We are a historic Christian community that joyfully praises God, welcomes all seekers, and steadfastly proclaims the love of Jesus Christ;” now therefore be it 

Resolved, that this 225th Annual Convention of the Diocese of Virginia joins with the clergy, laity and staff of the Diocese of Virginia, of Northern Piedmont Region, and the entire Markham-Hume and Fauquier County communities in congratulating and celebrating this milestone of achievement by the Vestry and congregation of The Episcopal Church of Leeds Parish, Markham, Virginia.

Submitted by the Rev. Katherine S. Bryant, Priest-in-Charge and the Vestry of Leeds, Markham

Background:

In its early years, the Leeds Parish worship services were held in private homes and a number of wooden church buildings. In 1842, the present church sanctuary was built of brick and stucco in the early Gothic revival style, and was consecrated by Bishop William Meade. The church continually met the spiritual needs of the Hume-Markham community in western Fauquier County, Virginia, and

  1. endeavors to affirm the reconciling Gospel of Jesus Christ in both word and deed by providing a ministry of worship and fellowship for our parish family, neighbors and visitors;
  2. nourishes those in need by supplying life-essential support through the Western Fauquier Christian Ministry with volunteers and food in-gatherings like Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Food Baskets to serve and share with those who have little or none; and providing quality of life enhancements for children through backpack and school supplies collections, Carol’s Christmas, and Operation Christmas Child ministries;
  3. Practices a truly ecumenical spirit, providing a place to worship for Christians of other denominations as well as Episcopalians;
  4. Serves as a center of Christian-based learning by holding an ecumenical Sunday School and providing free school educational facilities for the Leeds Episcopal Activity Preschool (LEAP);
  5. Sustains both domestic and international missions, including the Guatemala Youth Initiative, St. Marc’s Trade School in Trouin, Haiti, and St. James School in Philadelphia;
  6. Offers its facilities for use by numerous outside service and wellness organizations, including Alcoholics Anonymous; Leeds Ruritan Club, and Hume Homemakers.

Convention would be advised to recognize and congratulate The Episcopal Church of Leeds Parish for its past and ongoing accomplishments while celebrating its most recent milestone.

CR-4: Recognizing the Ministry of The Reverend Robert Hiller Malm

Whereas, the Reverend Robert Hiller Malm, a priest in the Diocese of Virginia, completed thirty years of ministry as the Rector of Grace Episcopal Church, Alexandria, and retired from that ministry on September 29, 2019; and

Whereas, the Reverend Robert Hiller Malm, was ordained to the diaconate in 1977, to the priesthood in 1978 and served as Assistant at St. Mary’s Church, High Point, North Carolina until 1979, as Chaplain at the Blue Ridge School, St. George, Virginia until 1980, as Assistant at The Church of the Advent, Boston, Massachusetts from 1980 until 1983, and as Rector, Christ Church, Portsmouth, New Hampshire from 1983 until 1989; and

Whereas, the Reverend Robert Hiller Malm was called to serve as Rector of Grace Episcopal Church, Alexandria, Virginia in June of 1989; and

Whereas, through Father Malm’s guidance and leadership, Grace Episcopal Church discerned itself to be A Center for Worship and Fellowship, A School for Discipleship and Stewardship; and A Community for Healing and Outreach, and lives out its mission through regular participation in the Eucharist and the practice of our baptismal promises; and

Whereas, Father Malm has lived into Grace Episcopal Church’s mission as A School for Discipleship and Stewardship through his active support and encouragement of the involvement and participation of the laity in every mission and ministry of Grace Episcopal Church; and

Whereas, Father Malm has lived into Grace Episcopal Church’s mission as A Center for Worship and Fellowship by supporting, encouraging, and facilitating a robust traditional High-Church worship program including five celebrations of the Holy Eucharist on Sundays – one which is in Spanish for our Spanish-speaking congregation, three celebrations of the Holy Eucharist during the week, daily Morning Prayer worship services for clergy and assistants, a very active and strong music program led by a fulltime music director, and  featuring adult and boys and girls choirs and a bell choir; and

Whereas, Father Malm has further lived into Grace Episcopal Church’s mission as A School for Discipleship through his steadfast dedication to the support and encouragement of many Grace Episcopal Church congregants in the discernment and pursuit of their call to ordained ministry; and

Whereas, Father Malm further lived into Grace Episcopal Church’s mission as A School for Discipleship through his unwavering support for the development, education, and training of many seminarians by providing encouragement, mentorship, guidance, liturgical experiences, and supervision; and

Whereas, Father Malm further lived into Grace Episcopal Church’s mission as A School for Discipleship through his support of the ministry of all the associate and assistant rectors who were called by Grace Episcopal Church during his tenure and by provided exceptional leadership, encouragement, training, mentorship, and  liturgical leadership experiences and opportunities; and

Whereas, Father Malm has further lived into Grace Episcopal Church’s mission as A Center for Worship and Fellowship and A School for Discipleship by proclaiming the Gospel through his insightful and gifted preaching, providing the hearer with roadmaps for discipleship and offering insights into practical ways through which our Lord’s messages can be applied to daily living; and

Whereas, Father Malm has lived into and exemplified Grace Episcopal Church’s mission as A Community for Healing and Outreach, through his compassionate pastoral care and support to parishioners who are troubled, sick, homebound, and/or grieving the loss of a loved-one; and

Whereas, Father Malm has further lived into Grace Episcopal Church’s mission as A School for Discipleship and Stewardship through his support of Grace Episcopal Church’s 1993 capital campaign and building program that significantly renovated, increased and upgraded the educational and program infrastructure of church, made all areas of the church handicapped accessible, and preserved and enhanced its traditional worship spaces, and the 2008 Grace Anew capital campaign that further improved the education building infrastructure and enhanced the beauty of our worship space and the vitality of the music program by the remodeling and expansion of  the choir loft and commissioning of a new, expanded pipe organ; and,

Whereas, Father Malm has continued to support improvements in the building and grounds infrastructure of Grace Episcopal Church and Grace Episcopal School through cooperative programs for shared maintenance and development of facility and infrastructure upgrades, including completion of an amphitheater, heating and ventilation system replacement, and installation of an upgraded, integrated information systems network throughout the building.

Whereas, Father Malm has actively supported the growth and continued development of Grace Episcopal Church’s programs for youth including Nursery School, Children’s Chapel and Godly Play, Sunday School, Rite 13, Journey to Adulthood, Episcopal Youth in Community, and Vacation Bible School, which provide rich learning and experiential mission opportunities for the parish’s children and youth; and

Whereas, Father Malm has provided leadership in fostering a close working relationship between the Grace Episcopal Church congregation and Grace Episcopal School, served as the Chaplain of Grace Episcopal School, and in that role, has actively supported the Christian education of the student body by teaching weekly religion classes and leading weekly chapel services; and

Whereas, Father Malm has helped Grace Church to be blessed by God and a blessing in the lives of others through his support and encouragement of mission trips by Grace Church youth and adult supervisors to help repair homes in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina; in Cedar Falls, Iowa, following a severe Mississippi River flood; in depressed areas of southwest Virginia; in Scottsboro, Alabama, after severe hurricanes; and in Little Egg Harbor, New Jersey, after Hurricane Sandy; and

Whereas, Father Malm has further helped Grace Church to be blessed by God and a blessing in the lives of others through his support and encouragement of international mission trips by Grace Church parishioners to destinations around the globe, including Tanzania, Honduras, and Haiti to – in the manner described by Episcopal Relief and Development – help save lives and strengthen communities around the world; and

Whereas, Father Malm has contributed to the leadership of the Diocese of Virginia by serving as a member of the Standing Committee of the Diocese of Virginia, and as Dean of the Alexandria Region; and 

Whereas, Father Malm has further lived into Grace Episcopal Church’s mission as A Community for Healing and Outreach, by encouraging and fostering an inclusive environment at Grace Episcopal Church that is welcoming to all people regardless of their race, ethnicity, cultural background, sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression; and

Whereas, Father Malm nurtures, fosters, and encourages the expression of joy and the spirit of Christian Community as exemplified by the spirit that abounds during Grace Church’s annual parish weekend at Shine Mont; and

Whereas, the Congregation of Grace Episcopal Church will miss him greatly, but celebrates with gratitude the impact he has made on our church worship and community, and the wonderful legacy he has left at Grace Episcopal Church; and

Now, be it therefore resolved, that the 225th Annual Convention of the Diocese of Virginia thanks the Reverend Robert Hiller Malm for his faithful leadership and service, and commends its prayers for continued service to all; and

Be it further resolved, that a copy of this resolution be provided to the Reverend Robert H. Malm and that it be recorded in the minutes of the 225th Annual Convention of the Diocese of Virginia.

Submitted on behalf of the congregation of Grace Episcopal Church by the Vestry, Wardens, Delegates to the 225th Annual Convention, and the Reverend Jason Roberson, Associate Rector.

CR-5: Honoring the Memory of the Rev. Cuthbert H. Mandell

Whereas, Cuthbert H. Mandell, having grown up as an avid outdoorsman with boating, fishing, and hunting in Lake Charles, Louisiana, and having earned an undergraduate degree in 1970 and a law degree in 1973 from Louisiana State University, served as an attorney in private practice, as general counsel for the Department of Natural Resources for the State of Louisiana, and as an administrative law judge; and

Whereas, having earned a master of divinity degree from Virginia Theological Seminary in 1994, he was ordained as a priest in The Episcopal Church in 1995; and

Whereas, the Rev. Cuthbert H. Mandell served parishes in the Diocese of West Virginia and in the Diocese of Massachusetts before serving as the rector of Aquia Episcopal Church in Stafford, Virginia, in the Diocese of Virginia, from March 1, 2001, to June 30, 2013; and

Whereas, his esteemed ministry in the Diocese of Virginia included serving on the Annual Council’s committee on constitution and canons (2004—2007), serving on the R-5 Task Force (2007—2008), serving on the Annual Council’s committee on resolutions (2010—2011), and being appointed to a search committee for a bishop suffragan (2011); and

Whereas, his retirement from Aquia Church was aptly honored by the 219th Annual Council of the Diocese of Virginia (2014) through the adoption of CR-4; and

Whereas, following his retirement, he moved to Pocomoke City, Maryland (in order to live closer to his son and daughter-in-law and their children), from whence he served as a supply priest and as an advisor for parishes and clergy in the Diocese of Easton and in the Diocese of Southern Virginia; and

Whereas, he subsequently moved to Bridgewater, Massachusetts (in order to live closer to his two daughters and their spouses and their children); and

Whereas, following several months of illness, he died on August 21, 2019, having earned the gratitude of clergy and laity alike in the several dioceses where he served; and

Whereas, he will be long remembered not only for his effective ministry but also for his many gifts, including his good humor, his abiding interests in such areas as history, literature, sports, and the outdoors, and especially his abundant love for his family and friends; and

Whereas, his ministry at Aquia Church and elsewhere always received faithful and commendable support from his wife, Jane Mandell, who used her own gifts for ministry widely and well: now therefore be it

Resolved, that the 225th Annual Convention of the Diocese of Virginia honor the cherished memory of the Rev. Cuthbert H. Mandell and the loyal service of his surviving wife, Jane Mandell, for their many years of faithful, fruitful ministry in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ at Aquia Episcopal Church in Stafford, Virginia, and elsewhere, and for the lasting legacy that they have left behind in several dioceses; and be it further

Resolved, that the secretary of the Diocese is requested to forward Jane Mandell and her family a copy of this resolution and to record it in the Journal of this Convention.

Submitted by the Rev. Jay Morris, rector of Aquia Episcopal Church, Stafford, Virginia, on behalf of the congregation and vestry.

CR-6: The Rev. Deacon Edward W. Jones

Whereas, the Rev. Deacon Edward Wilson Jones commenced his ministry in the Episcopal Church as a devoted lay leader at St. George’s, Fredericksburg, serving in such capacities as vestry member, Senior Warden, and at various times chair of a Rector Search Committee, Outreach Committee, and Adult Education Committee; and

Whereas, the Rev. Deacon Jones began his work in the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia by implementingCenter Aisle, at the behest of Bishop Peter James Lee, in order to provide a middle ground voice at General Convention. Through seven General Conventions he served as its editor, ever searching for ways to expand and redesign this publication to meet changing needs and communication platforms; and

Whereas, in later adulthood he discerned and accepted a deeper call to the Episcopal Church in the servant ministry of vocational deacon, completing the requisite training to be ordained on February 23, 2013, then serving in that capacity at St. Mary’s, Colonial Beach; and

Whereas, immediately after his ordination to the vocational diaconate, he retired from a 48-year career in print journalism, including 12 years as editor of the Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star, to accept the call as Secretary of the Diocese of Virginia and Chief of Staff of the Diocesan Staff at Mayo House; and

Whereas, the Rev. Deacon Jones ever kept before himself and us the need to revise diocesan structures and ministries, including Episcopal Diocesan Homes and the Regional Revisioning Task Force, to enable updated response to the changing circumstances of this world; and

Whereas, the Rev. Deacon Jones worked tirelessly to facilitate peace and reconciliation within the Episcopal Church as well as between our Church and other communities, religious and secular; and

Whereas, ending his tenure as Secretary of the Diocese of Virginia and Chief of Staff at Mayo House to fully enjoy a well-earned retirement in his colonial eighteenth century Fredericksburg house with his wife, Peggy, their ever-growing menagerie of rescued cats, and extensive library of biographies of U.S. Presidents; now therefore be it

Resolved, that we give thanks for the Rev. Deacon Jones’ ministry among us and his service and dedication to Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, and that this 225th Annual Convention of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia recognize with gratitude the contributions the Rev. Deacon Jones has made to our communal life as a diocese.

Submitted by the Bishops and the Staff of the Diocese of Virginia

CR-7: The Rt. Rev. Robert Wilkes Ilhoff

Whereas, the Rt. Rev. Robert Wilkes Ilhoff has served our Lord in the ordained ministry for over 52 years, including 12 years as Bishop of Maryland, 1995-2007; and

Whereas, in early 2018 the Bishop Ilhoff accepted the call of the Rt. Rev. Shannon Sherwood Johnston, Bishop of Virginia, to put aside full-time retirement to serve in the Diocese of Virginia as part-time Assisting Bishop; and

Whereas, Bishop Ilhoff extended his tenure as Assisting Bishop through subsequent transitions in the Episcopate in this diocese, providing the guidance of his long experience in the Episcopal Church; and

Whereas, Bishop Ilhoff has brought to this Diocese his particular gifts of candor, honesty, and transparency to all things, addressing many Diocese of Virginia needs, particularly stewardship and congregational support of the Diocese; and

Whereas, through his presence and accessibility at meetings of the Regions of the Diocese of Virginia, Bishop Ilhoff has brought to the Regions greater diocesan connection; and

Whereas, Bishop Ilhoff has worked tirelessly to build vital community among the vocational deacons of the Diocese of Virginia to support their ministry and to bring them to a fuller place in the life of the Diocese to further fulfilling their role in communicating the needs of the world to the Church; and

Whereas, Bishop Ilhoff has been an enthusiastic supporter of and advocate of the diocesan staff; and

Whereas, Bishop Ilhoff developed with Bishop Susan Goff a particularly fruitful, collegial relationship to further their mutual and complementary ministries; and

Whereas, Bishop Ilhoff elected to conduct this ministry in Virginia, while maintaining his family home in Baltimore, and uncomplainingly braving the challenges of the Maryland-Virginia commute, particularly the Washington Beltway and I-95; and

Whereas, Bishop Ilhoff is bowing to God’s call to take on a similar ministry in the Diocese of Maryland at the invitation of his successor, The Rt. Rev. Eugene Sutton, commencing January 1, 2020, enabling him to minister closer to his home and his wife, Nancy; therefore be it

Resolved, that we give heartfelt thanks for Bishop Ilhoff’s ministry among us and his service and dedication to Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, and that this 225th Annual Convention of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia recognize with gratitude the contributions he has made to our communal life as a diocese.

Submitted by the staff of the Diocese of Virginia

CR-8: Nurse Lynn Gray, Shrine Mont Camps Nursing Director

Whereas, Lynn Gray commenced her ministry for The Diocese of Virginia as a camp nurse at Shrine Mont Camps in 2006 and

Whereas, Lynn Gray served as the Nursing Director of Shrine Mont Camps for twelve years, selflessly devoting her hours (waking and sometimes sleeping) to the care and concern of campers across backgrounds, ages, and walks of life. She coordinated care for all campers and staff, overseeing other nurses, check-in procedures, and emergency situations, as well as day to day operations of the clinics, including medication delivery and illnesses; and

Whereas, Lynn Gray, known by all as “Nurse Lynn,” gave of herself through listening, communication, caretaking, and the soothing of anxieties for countless campers, staffers, and parents over her years of service, often being a point of first contact for nervous camp parents, homesick campers, and tired staffers; and

Whereas, ending her time as the Nursing Director of Shrine Mont Camps in order to fully enjoy retirement in her home in Culpeper with her husband, Rev. Michael Gray and their children and grandchildren; now therefore be it

Resolved, that we give thanks for Lynn Gray’s ministry to Shrine Mont Camps and her service and dedication to the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia, and that this 225th Annual Convention of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia recognize with gratitude the contributions that Lynn Gray, RN, as made to our life in the Diocese and the lives of countless campers and staff members at Shrine Mont Camps.

Submitted by the Bishops and the Staff of the Diocese of Virginia

CR-9: The Rev. Dr. Christopher Agnew

Whereas, the Rev. Dr. Christopher Mack Agnew was called to parish ministry in the Diocese of Virginia in 2000 with a long history of ministry in Ecumenical Relations between the Episcopal Church and other religious bodies, including, Associate Ecumenical Officer, Episcopal Church, 1989-1994;  Member, National Council of Churches Faith and Order Commission, 1991-1994; Member, National Council of Churches Interfaith Relations Commission, 1991-1992, and Chair, National Council of Churches Christian-Jewish Relations Committee 1991-1999; and

Whereas, since his arrival in the Diocese of Virginia, the Rev. Dr. Agnew has worked tirelessly and faithfully here and elsewhere, on ecumenical matters and relationships; and

Whereas, since 2000, the Rev. Dr. Agnew has served on the Virginia Diocesan Ecumenical Interfaith Commission, later Committee, first as a consultant, then as a member, and since 2006 as its co-chair; and

Whereas, since 2002 the Rev. Dr. Agnew has served as the Chair of the Faith and Order Commission of the Virginia Council of Churches; and

Whereas, from 2002-2009 the Rev. Dr. Agnew served as associate Ecumenical Officer of the Diocese of Virginia; and since 2009 has served as primary Ecumenical Officer of the Diocese of Virginia; and

Whereas, in 2013 the Rev. Dr. Agnew received the Faith in Action Award of the Virginia Council of Churches for his work in ecumenical and interfaith outreach; and

Whereas, on November 6, 2019, the Virginia Council of Churches bestowed upon the Rev Dr. Agnew its Lifetime Ecumenist Award for his passionate efforts on behalf of faith and order, and meaningful relationships across religious divides; and

Whereas, in all of these posts and others too numerous to name the Rev. Dr. Agnew has served as the leading voice and advocate of the Diocese of Virginia in all things ecumenical, excited about living the meaning of John 17:1, “that they may all be one. As you, Father are in me and I am in you, may they also be in us, so that the world may believe that you have sent me;” and

Whereas, as the Rev. Dr. Agnew has discerned the time has come for him to retire from his active role in interfaith work in the Diocese of Virginia to allow a new generation to carry forth this vision of cooperation and find new ways to bring it to fruition, and to concentrate his ministry on his congregations, St. Paul’s, Nomini Grove, and St. James, Montross, his wife, Elizabeth; and another passion, Episcopal Church history research and writing; therefore be it

Resolved, that we give thanks for the Rev. Dr. Agnew’s ministry among us, his service and dedication to Diocese of Virginia, and his faithful ministry in working to make us all one body, that this 225th Annual Convention of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia recognize with gratitude the contributions he has made to our communal life as a diocese and a member of the wider faith communities.

Submitted by the Bishops and Canonical Officers of the Diocese of Virginia

CR-10: Honoring the Service and Retirement of the Rev. Kent Rahm

Whereas the retired Reverend Kent Rahm, Rector of Trinity Episcopal Church in Fredericksburg, VA, served as Rector for 22 years, dedicating his professional life to the well-being of his parish and the community at large until his retirement June 30, 2019; and

Whereas the Rev. Rahm led worship in an inspiring and courageous manner during his years at Trinity; and

Whereas the Rev. Rahm contributed to the musical life of the church, chanting the Eucharist weekly and playing guitar on occasional Sundays and in the Trinity Contemporary Band, seeking new ways to use music as an instrument of worship; and

Whereas the Rev. Rahm performed baptisms, weddings, and funerals and commissioned service groups throughout his time at Trinity, bringing joy and comfort and resolve to many parishioners; and

Whereas the Rev. Rahm initiated and/or supported new ministries at Trinity, such as Healing Prayer Teams, support groups for long-term caregivers and for grieving parishioners, organizations specifically for senior members and for young adults, and a parish trip to the Holy Land; and

Whereas the Rev. Rahm endeavored to keep himself up-to-date and in touch with as many age groups as possible in the parish, including a sabbatical to discover ways to keep the church more in touch with younger adult populations; and

Whereas the Rev. Rahm was an initiator and leader with Micah Ministries, an ecumenical coalition to help homeless people in Fredericksburg, as well as with other humanitarian organizations in the Fredericksburg area; and

Whereas the Rev. Rahm was a leader and contributor in Region and Diocesan activities; and

Whereas the Rev. Rahm was a supporter of Episcopal theology and policy and led others through his words and actions; and

Whereas the Rev. Rahm was a support, guide, and comfort to parishioners in need; now, therefore be it

Resolved, that this 225th Annual Convention of the Diocese of Virginia prayerfully honor and thank Rev. Kent Rahm for his faithful leadership and service to his parishioners, the Diocese of Virginia, and his fellow men and women, adults and children; and

Be it further resolved, that a copy of this resolution be provided to the Reverend Kent D. Rahm and that it be recorded in the minutes of the 225th Annual Convention of the Diocese of Virginia.

Submitted by the Wardens and Vestry of Trinity, Fredericksburg.

CR-11: Honoring the Memory and Ministry of the Rev. Charles L. “Charlie” Johnson

Whereas, Charles L. Johnson, was born in Four Oaks, North Carolina, and earned his Bachelor of Arts in Church History Roanoke College in 1962; and

Whereas, having graduated from Virginia Theological Seminary in 1965, he was ordained to the diaconate June 12, 1965 and to the priesthood June 18, 1966 by the Rt. Rev. Robert F. Gibson, Jr., Bishop of Virginia; and

Whereas, his congregational ministries, primarily in the Diocese of Virginia, included Assistant Rector, St. Thomas, Richmond, 1965-67; Rector, St. Paul’s, Haymarket, 1967-1970, Assistant Rector, St. Matthew’s, Richmond, 1970-1976; Rector, St. Barnabas,  North Chesterfield, 1976-1980; Rector, Christ, Gardiner, Maine, 1989-1993; Rector, Kingston Parish, Mathews, 1993-1999; Interim, All Saints, Richmond, 2000-2001; and Interim, St. Michael’s, Richmond, 2004-2006; and

Whereas, he was appointed Assistant to Suffragan Bishop David Lewis, for Ministry and Congregational Development, 1980-1989; and

Whereas his other service in the Diocese of Virginia have included membership on the Standing Committee, 1995-1998; the Diocesan Missionary Society 1999-2008; and the Bishop Coadjutor Transition Committee, 2006-2008; and

Whereas “the joy of the Lord was his strength,” he was always fair-minded and insightful in the midst of resolving conflicts, patient to carefully listen to every concern and always finding joy in the Lord no matter what was occurring and lessening tensions with his great gift of humor; and

Whereas, his final long-term ministry in the Diocese of Virginia, was as Chaplain to the Community of Retired Clergy and Families, 2005-2018, in which he always reached out to retired clergy and their spouses with advocacy and a personal touch, creating community and loving pastoral care, particularly upon the death of one of the marriage partners; and

Whereas, in late 2018 he stepped away from his ministry to retired clergy and their spouses due to his own declining heath, and peacefully departed this life June 11, 2019; and

Whereas, we and Virginia, better known as “Ginny,” his wife of 57 years, his sons Stephen (Tamara) and Paul (Lisa), and his two granddaughters, Lindsay and Natalie, will deeply miss the twinkle in his eye, his deep love for all kinds of ministry, and his living his ever present and unwavering belief that we are all beloved children of God; now therefore be it

Resolved, that we give thanks to God for the gift of the life and ministry among us of the Rev. Charles L. Johnson, and that this 225th Annual Convention of the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia recognize with gratitude the contributions the Rev. Mr. Johnson has made to our communal life as a diocese and to the lives of untold numbers of God’s people.

Submitted by the Rev. Barbara “Bambi” Willis.